Presentations

From SQL to NoSQL: the fourth time's the charm

From SQL to NoSQL: the fourth time's the charm

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with Codd, and the Word was Codd. The beginning – of the database field as we know it today, that is – was 1970. And of course, the Word was the relational model: rows and columns, a normalized (and flat) world. The spartan simplicity of that early relational model, together with the very idea of a logical data model, enabled revolutionary changes: declarative queries, transparent indexing, query optimization, and scalable run-time parallelism, among others. Also from this beginning grew a multi-billion dollar market for relational database systems and tools. And the rest, as they say, is history ...
 

While relational languages and systems have served us well for nearly half a century, they have always been a bit of a "misfit" when it comes to application data and requirements, particularly for user-facing applications. Time and again this issue has been identified and "solved" – or not. Three notable attempts to address this "impedance mismatch" between applications and databases were object-oriented databases, object-relational databases, and XML databases. Each attempt, in the end, "fell flat" (so to speak) as compared to the success of relational databases. Another attempt is happening today, in the "Big Data" era, in the form of "NoSQL" databases. In this talk, the speaker will share his views about what went wrong the first three times, what lasting lessons resulted, and why differences in the environment today lead to the conclusion that the fourth time will be the charm.